I have to tell this dream to everyone. Langchen-la is a Tibetan term of endearment for the elephant. And this elephant in my dream came from a foreign land somewhere beyond the Himalayas, walking the very path that His Holiness would later walk into exile, its long trunk swinging back and forth, its big ears like fans, its four, heavy limbs. All along the road, Bod pa[1] were awed by this miraculous trace of a god, one of the seven treasures.[2] They pressed their palms together, overflowing with love, a spontaneous festival celebrating this bodily manifestation of the elephant god. [1] Bod pa (བོད་པ་) is the Tibetan word for Tibetan people [2] The seven treasures, or emblems of royalty, Gyal si na dün (རྒྱལ་སྲིད་སྣ་བདུན་): the precious jewel, the precious wheel, the precious queen, the precious minister, the precious horse, the precious elephant, and the precious general. They are understood to be seven aspects of the path to awakening. The precious elephant symbolizes mindfulness.     [1] Langchen (གླང་ཆེན་), is the Tibetan word for elephant. And when you add –la at the end, Langchen-la (གླང་ཆེན་ལགས་), it becomes a term of endearment. The -la means respect or love, something like Dearest Elephant. Over time, Langchen-la became the name for the specific elephants kept by the Dalai Lama. [1] Bod pa (བོད་པ་) is the Tibetan word for Tibetan people [1] The seven treasures, or emblems of royalty, Gyal si na dün (རྒྱལ་སྲིད་སྣ་བདུན་): the precious jewel, the precious wheel, the precious queen, the precious minister, the precious horse, the precious elephant, and the precious general. They are understood to be seven aspects of the path to awakening. The precious elephant symbolizes mindfulness. [1] Dzongyab Lukhang (རྫོང་རྒྱབ་ཀླུ་ཁང་།): Temple behind the Potala Palace. Known as the Dragon Pond in Chinese. [1] Phodrang Potala (ཕོ་བྲང་པོ་ཏ་ལ་): The Tibetan name for the Potala Palace. [1] The Tsekor is a prayer path worshipers walk when circumambulating the Potala Palace.